The Other Side Of The Boob Job

Spread the love

If you hear the words boob job, you would most likely think of the breast augmentation surgery – women who look into boob jobs certainly want to have more voluptuous chests, right? Well, the answer to that question is, not always. Boobs jobs are not always about augmentation; they can also be about reduction – making your chest a few sizes smaller than you originally had.

Of course, quite a number of women (and most likely, a large number of men) wonder what exactly would warrant such reduction surgeries, but the reasoning behind them is often quite simple – large chests often place an undue burden on the body (often the back), which can be quite painful to live with. Breast reduction Malvern surgeries, unlike the breast augmentation surgeries that see the use of silicone breast implants, see the removal of excess skin, glandular tissues and fat in the breasts to bring their size down.

Most women who look into reduction surgeries have often had their breasts grow early on in their puberty to double letter cup sizes, and as a result, had to suffer through incessant neck, back and shoulder pains due to the weight of their chest. That being said, this is not the only reason why women pursue this specific procedure – sports and active lifestyles are yet another common reason. In these cases, women are often athletes who simply find their large chests impeding their activities. Yet another popular reason is self-confidence issues. Indeed, women with large chests often find themselves victim to issues with their self-esteem, whether that is related to frequent sexual harassment or the fact that they might not be seen for ‘who they are’.

Of course, there are a number of other reasons besides these, but it is worthwhile to know that this specific plastic surgery procedure boasts of incredibly high levels of satisfaction by women (as well as trans-men) who have undergone it. That being said, like augmentation procedures, reduction surgery requires you to be well-informed before you proceed to have your breasts reduced (or you might find yourself not very pleased with the results!). For starters, as a cosmetic procedure, you will find that many health insurances won’t cover the surgery for you – you will likely have to pay for it by yourself.

Besides this, there are many points common to both breast procedures (such as a similar recovery period of one week, or the fact that this can also impede breastfeeding). However, there are also specific differences between the two. One such difference is the fact that you might be asked to lose weight before the procedure. This is because your chest size might be tied to your weight – it is quite common to see chest size shrink with a loss in weight (and this makes reduction unnecessary at this point).